Listened to the artist – Julia Holderness

 

Listened to a talk tonight by Julia Holderness

There was no mention of “the theatre workshops at the Bauhaus” that were in the blurb & what attracted me.

Wonderful exploration of metaxy, medial aspect, “truth”.

Exhibitions | University of Canterbury
— Read on www.canterbury.ac.nz/arts/schools-and-departments/school-of-fine-arts/exhibitions/

Working with a range of archival materials from the Macmillan Brown Library & Heritage Collections, Julia Holderness explores her own textile making alongside that of artist and teacher Florence Akins (1906-2012). Akins’ documents relate to her teaching of textiles at the Canterbury College School of Art, and include lecture notes and other instructional resources such as colour diagrams. Holderness reworks them and presents their possible entanglement with the international Bauhaus movement. Connections are also made with Florence Weir (1899-1979), currently the only known New Zealander to have studied at the Bauhaus. In 1936 Weir designed the costumes and sets for a local Christchurch production, and these were said to have been inspired by her time at the Bauhaus. The production was never staged publicly, and in the absence of any surviving documentation, Holderness imagines these designs in an appliqué series. This exhibition is part of a Visual Arts PhD in practice-led research at Auckland University of Technology, in which Holderness develops practices of fabrication, approximation and invention to interrogate archives and their construction of art-historical narratives.

“…construction of art-history.” ?

Reflections: Blog & Gallery

Presenting my work is more on my mind right now than making it. Not as much fun, but presentation floats to the top, unbidden. I am thinking about both the world and online. I’ll focus on the latter.

I have changed the name of this blog to “Walter Logeman: Art” with the subtitle In this moment… My art Blog” the reason is clarity. It is still the same blog, I am still “In this moment…” and it is still, as it says on the About Page:

Nothing but art, artists, art talk, art history, art philosophy, pictures and projects. Most of my work and work-in-progress is on this blog.

The clarity seems right because I am working on a Gallery. If you go there now (as I write this) you will see it is heavily under construction.

With the Gallery I can post exhibits, and show work that is complete. Series. Simple. More stable. I sometimes refine an image I have already blogged as I present them to other sites. I will focus on quality.

You can sub to the Gallery in RSS and watch progress and then see updates as they happen including my fumblings. Better still sub to this blog’s RSS, I will announce all Gallery news here as well.

The first things to be shown there will be my Earth Crosses, of course. Next FLAX.

Excellent article on Peter Doig

Guardian

Charles Saatchi came to some of Doig’s early shows, in pubs and odd spaces, but he never bought anything. The press was full of articles about the death of painting, but Doig, who by now had a wife whom he’d met at St Martin’s and the first of their five kids, trusted those obituaries were exaggerated.

Perhaps one consequence of his rootless childhood was a hoarder’s habit: he was a great collector of images and scraps of things, taking Polaroids, hanging on to bits of strangeness he saw. In London, he often went to Canada House on Trafalgar Square to raid its library of travel brochures, trying to make some sense of his memories of adolescence in Toronto. In contrast to the slickness of the art that was making headlines, he had a desire to make paintings that were resolutely ‘homely’, often literally so: a recurring obsession in his work were colloquial suburban and rural houses, glimpsed from across roads or through trees, domestic images so singular that they shift, like David Lynch scenes, into the territory of uncanny.

White Canoe Image follows:

Continue reading “Excellent article on Peter Doig”

Dame Edna – Barry Humphries – Art Online

This is innovative!

Barry Humphries will go head to head with his alter ego, Dame Edna Everage, tomorrow in a public battle for artistic appreciation. The 73-year-old Australian star, who is recovering from peritonitis that almost killed him earlier this month, has decided to go ahead with the launch of his innovative online art gallery. Humphries has painted seriously since his teens and has agreed to be at the centre of a new art project that will allow internet users not just to download his work for free, but to alter it.

Free paintings and the right to alter them. I wonder if you can also sell them on!

I am interested as my own copyright is loose, but more restricted.

There is one difference, he has the original, in the case of my digitals you can access the actual original. (ask me for the URL)

I am looking forward to seeing these, when I find them I will make another post.

Wired Picks Its 10 Favorite 2007 Illustrations

Wired Picks Its 10 Favorite 2007 Illustrations

They look ok, but I can’t tell anymore, I am drowning in images. This one stands out.

Riccardo Vecchio captures this context exquisitely in his rich illustration of gene therapy pioneer French Anderson: It looks both modern and traditional, at once.

I am interested in their phrase: “modern and traditional” it looks as if the digital touch makes it modern.

Riccardo Vecchio

Image follows

Continue reading “Wired Picks Its 10 Favorite 2007 Illustrations”