No Subtitles Necessary: Laszlo & Vilmos

IMDB

Thoroughly enjoyed this documentary about two Hungarians who came to the US in 1953. Both great cinematographers.

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Laszlo Kovacs

On the strength of this dock watched Easy Rider again – more interesting after hearing Laszlo Kovacs talk about the movie.

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Vilmos Zsigmond

Now looking forward to McCabe and Mrs Miller

Limitless – Movie

Limitless. ***

Some well made shots, explores something about the mind. Quite gripping, and then looses the whole plot as nothing is resolved and the ending is weak.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1219289/

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Lots

Lots of tabs open of Firefox, this one, the origins of the current layout for this blog:  Kubrick at Binary Bonsai is here cause I’m looking for a way of making the font abit smaller. But I think I need to be off the hosted WordPress site to do that. This one  http://film.guardian.co.uk because it was linked to from the Kubrick theme page. While on the subject of Kubrick, we saw “Eyes Wide Shut” the other day, a friend recommended it for its “Jungian” aspect. Makes sense, the two protagonists are exploring a similar synchronous path, one in RL and the other in dreams.

Stanley Kubrick

The Kubrick Site & IMDB  More Kubrick, and we did more too, got out Paths Of Glory, but did not really like it much. Got that from here: Movieshack – Library

Only on Tab one of about 25!  The next:  Abit of vanity:  Looking for the oldest entry with my name in it and found one from February 1994 and more vanity, embarrasing:  1998 Psybernet Web page

Later… never did get to blog the other tabs… nevermind.

Kubrick

Kubrick at Binary Bonsai . This one http://film.guardian.co.uk was linked to from the Kubrick theme page. While on the subject of Kubrick, we saw "Eyes Wide Shut" the other day, a friend recommended it for its "Jungian" aspect. Makes sense, the two protagonists are exploring a similar synchronous path, one in RL or Waking Life and the other in dreams.

Stanley Kubrick

The Kubrick Site & IMDB More Kubrick, and we did more too, got out Paths Of Glory, but did not really like it much. Got that from here: Movieshack – Library.

More Moore

MTV.com

There are layers & layers of interconnection, which is one of the themes of the book / film and there is no shortage of this complexity in all the background drama & the characters, who are as engrossing as the art.

I have a theory, which has not let me down so far, that there is an inverse relationship between imagination and money. Because the more money and technology that is available to [create] a work, the less imagination there will be in it. My favorite films are those that were made on a shoestring. And they weren't adaptations of some other work, they were original pieces of cinema. All right, [Cocteau's] "La Belle Et La Bête" is an adaptation of "Beauty and the Beast" — but it was made into something very different. And I mean, John Waters, his early films, they're terrific! Because he was making them with some friends of his from Baltimore, with whatever cheap film stock he could borrow or steal. George Romero, in "Dawn of the Dead," "Day of the Dead," all the rest of them, he ingeniously used the fact that he had almost no budget to his advantage — claustrophobic sets, everyone's trapped in the cellar and the zombies are trying to dig their way in. Very inexpensive, incredibly powerful. That is where cinema really works for me.

Moore goes on to say exactly some of what I have in mind for my treatise on the difference between the movie & the film:

It's a thwarted and frustrated and perhaps largely impotent American liberal fantasy of someone with American liberal values [standing up] against a state run by neo-conservatives — which is not what "V for Vendetta" was about. It was about fascism, it was about anarchy, it was about [England].

Not just the usual suspects

AFI’s 100 YEARS…100 MOVIE QUOTES, loved looking at this list, some great quotes, some just part of the language, but I did not know where they came from. Like this one:

Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make.

Dracula 1931. I only know the phrase from the Cassandra Wilson song. And “Round up the usual suspects” – Cassablanca. Makes me want to see some old movies just to hear the quotes!

Living Vicariously

Forster, E. M. (Edward Morgan): The Machine Stops Literature Annotations

Another prophetic writer… hit on the idea of movies and email before WW1. Upholds the notion that we are better off not living vicariously with the aid of machines. Does he have a point? Makes me think of the Lunig cartoon of the family watching the sunset on TV while it is happening outside the window.

Maybe there is a point to it. As in: Joyce Kilmer. 1886–1918

119. Trees

I THINK that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the sweet earth’s flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day, 5
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain. 10

Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

But what if we reversed the idea:

I THINK that I shall never see a tree lovely as a poem.
In a poem the tree becomes sacred.

We spend a lot of time here in space looking at words – and somehow that seems important… to be in the noosphere. We value nature but travel to see art galleries.

We make God in our image of God.