conferences.oreillynet.com/etech

Technorati: Search for http://conferences.oreillynet.com/etech/ The O’Reilly Emerging Technology Conference is of course being blogged as it happens, and it is not over as I write. I hope Doug Kaye is there & I look forward to the IT conversations. ( Yes he’s there! ) For now it is blog cruising.

Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life – What’s Wrong with Podcasting?

AC/OS: Rules from O’Reilly

All the Pages Are My Days :: eTech05: Building Contentcentric Apps

Susan Mernit’s Blog: eTech flow

Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life – ETech 2005 Trip Report: Web Services as a Strategy for Startups: Opening Up and Letting Go

Boing Boing: ETECH Notes: Web Services as a Strategy for Startups

onfocus.com | ETech Day 1

Here are the photos.

Another Great IT Conversation – Jerry Fiddler

I have been listening to Jerry Fiddler the Windriver owner. Very interesting on the whole direction of the future. Intersection of biology and engineering. He mentions Steven Webber Success of Open Source 5stars – a Political Scientist from Berkeley who is saying that Open Source is a new mode of production.

I think I have said that here on the blog a few times, but I recently also though how public works are a very similar mode. To create something all capitalists benefit from, but none could really own, at least initially, the state steps in: space, roads, education and so on.

It seems that Open Source creates those things that may be like that – Linux for example competes with MS but is really a sort of road for many enterprises who should & could not just use proprietary roads, they need to share roads.

Still, it is a different mode of production. But not one that is necessarily going to create a new revolutionary class, as new modes such as industrialisation did.

(I will tidy these email posts up later) – Tuesday, 25 January 2005 — now done!

Easter Saturday 2000 recycled

I was looking for something in the old EditThisPage weblog I kept and was struck by a lovely (if I say so myself) sequence of posts, I have reproduced them here more or less as they were there. I like to keep a series of great pix going in the links. I did that even in the old links pages. I’d never post one I do not like. Aesthetics count and I like to keep tweaking the look. The photo from the Chester Street garden is nostalgic, we moved out last November!

www.oreilly.com — Animal Magnetism: Making O’Reilly Animals

pelican

”From start to finish, an O’Reilly animal requires anywhere from 8 to 20 hours of manual labor. And for reasons no one can fully explain, hand-drawn animals on high-tech computer books became a wild success.”

I think it is because computers were never about the thing itself… the fetish is about the living and organic thing they do. I feel an affinity with the O’Reilly images as I have used the William Morris tapestry in as a logo for years, I see a similarity… the same idea, something, in this case, hand crafted, beautiful and symbolic of the Psybernet work… (tree of) life work contained in the (circle) groups.

With that in mind I kept looking. How is this for something Psybernet, more Morris stuff, the harvesting of our work?

TalkAboutTheNews.com
(Note: the site has since gone)

“Welcome to the first test MP3 audio webcast from TalkAboutTheNews.com.

This is a recording of interviews and conversations at the Mobilization for Global Justice in Washington DC.
Please subscribe to our newsletter for updates and how you can create your own MP3 news/talk webcasts in the near future. TalkAboutTheNews.com will be providing free webspace, discussion boards, polls, and a whole lot more! Stay in touch! Listen to the unedited MP3 WebCast streamed by Live365.com “

Well if this was a test it worked beautifully and it seems great to be able to get the feel from people on the spot… as it is right there. What a contrast the sounds of a demonstration are with my autumn shot in the garden today.

Autumn2000

Cybertime

Cybertime
Meg Hourinan in O’Reilly Network: What We’re Doing When We Blog [Jun. 13, 2002]:

What distinguishes a collection of posts from a traditional home page or Web page? Primarily it’s the reverse-chronological order in which posts appear. When a reader visits a weblog, she is always confronted with the newest information at the top of the page.Having the freshest information at the top of the page does a few things: as readers, it gives a sense of immediacy with no effort on our part. We don’t have to scan the page, looking for what’s new or what’s been changed. If content has been added since our last visit, it’s easy to see as soon as the page loads.

Additionally, the newest information at the top (coupled with its time stamps and sense of immediacy) sets the expectation of updates, an expectation reinforced by our return visits to see if there’s something new. Weblogs demonstrate that time is important by the very nature in which they present their information. As weblog readers, we respond with frequent visits, and we are rewarded with fresh content.

Cyberspace is what we called it but cybertime might have fitted as easily. Space is shrunk so we have a global village (perhaps) and time has altered the notion of now. It has altered it to the extent that we have to use words like “real-time”, synchronous, asynchronous. The passage by Meg Hourinan draws attention to this simple phenomena, the use of time… not unexpectedly in web logs. Yes the content is “fresh” or stale… but a strange thing happens, by logging it old content becomes fresh. I think so anyway. I often log old items here, because I think they are still fresh. Sometimes because they are particularly old, like my notes on Huxley’s Crome Yellow. The asynchronous nature of email and web groups is a way that the now has stretched. But for it to be experienced as a stretch we need to see the date. This dating of items is needed so we can get the timing right on the wave we are surfing. Dating items on the web was there from the early days with the conventional Last Updated line at the bottom of the page. With weblogs it has promoted itself to the top. Hmmm, as in newspapers, hence the weblog is more like journalism. Journals too have dates. Rebecca Blood mentions

In early 1999 Brigitte Eaton compiled a list of every weblog she knew about and created the Eatonweb Portal. Brig evaluated all submissions by a simple criterion: that the site consist of dated entries. Webloggers debated what was and what was not a weblog, but since the Eatonweb Portal was the most complete listing of weblogs available, Brig’s inclusive definition prevailed.

All this is of particular interest in that it echoes what happens in the psyche. From the outside it looks as if people in therapy are examining the past, but that is not so. What they bring to a session is “fresh” — because they brought it! And why? Because the pattern of the past will be repeating in the present and the pattern is the interesting thing. Patterns of the soul – archetypes – are worth catching. To be fully there – the ‘past’ also needs to be time-stamped — it is impossible to imagine a specific feeling without a specific moment (or span of them). The underlying pattern is outside of time. Fits with the idea that the soul is eternal. e-ternal, not a reference to the e words but just wondering if it means outside of time?

Firefox, Evhead

EVHEAD
Evan Williams, president/CEO of Pyra Labs, the creators and operators of Blogger, writes:

By the way, I was starting to dig Mozilla a while back and using it quite a bit, but now I’ve found I’ve migrated back to IE. The main reasons: IE opens when I click a link from email (this could be changed, I know). And IE starts quicker.

I’m still with Mozilla and loving it. Why? Tabs Browsing. Set up the tabs so they open in the background and so that you can use the middle button (wheel) to open them on a link in web page, and use the middle button to shut the tabs when you are done. I bet IE will ape this real soon, as it is just impossible for me to go back.

I have not found a way to open emails as a new tab in an open browser, but my email does go to Mozilla. Fast enough for me, faster I think than IE?

But Evan, the Edit this Post box is tiny in Blogger on my screen in Mozilla…

Blogging, audience, oral tradition and the difference

“audiences”

But for all its pretensions to be an extension of this everyday orality, blogging is instead a) textual and b) radically public. In the blogosphere there’s no possibility of controlling audience boundaries and the numerous voices I use to speak to those many audiences who don’t overhear my conversations with the other audiences. Blogging requires me to choose one way of expressing my thoughts on a subject, one persona, for all possible audiences once and for all time. The fact that I can later elaborate or change my mind or my tone pales in comparison to the massive reduction of that oral multiplicity of audience and voice I described above to a single text which is not only archived–thus welcoming exegeses to which an oral conversation is rarely subjected–but which all potential audiences anywhere in the world can read upon its first posting. There is a rather severe sense in which blogging makes impossible any flexible, modulated negotiation among audiences; there is only the One Audience, the Mass Audience, and it imposes a good deal of constraint on how you speak and what you decide to say at all.

I post this because somewhere I just added to the already stale notion that emails and weblogs are somewhat of a revival of oral tradition. Turbulent Velvet (pseudonym) writes on the refreshing ufobreakfast. There are comments on the site, and there of course the more usual idea that this is a conversation is defended.

Blog

Three plus top box

Whee! I have just updated the whole of the template for the blog! Simple look – white like it has been for a while but this time with a CSS – Cascading Style Sheet – which I will be able to use for all my three column layouts now.

The link above is to the info I used to learn the layout.