Book: The Heart, Frida Kahlo in Paris by Marc Petitjean

 

“Marc Petitjean grew up in a house where Frida Kahlo’s painting, The Heart, also named Memory, hung on one of the walls. Uncovering the story of how the painting was given by Frida to his father, Michel Petitjean, he unfurls not only a passionate love affair between them in pre-Second-World-War Paris, but also a back story about Frida’s paintings around the time and the intersections between France’s surrealist circles and contemporary politics.”

 

Enjoying this half invented book with lots of name dropping of French artists in the thirties. Interesting.  Here is the art in question 

 

Listening on Scribd

 

and reading on Kindle.

So many people! I’ll bring them in and their art as I did with another book Optic Nerve (blog post)

I’ll start with Frida and then Diego Rivera

Continue reading “Book: The Heart, Frida Kahlo in Paris by Marc Petitjean”

Social Work, Sociometry, & Psychodrama: Experiential Approaches for Group Therapists, Community Leaders, and Social Workers Dr. Scott Giacomucci, DSW, LCSW, BCD, FAAETS, PAT

Social Work, Sociometry, & Psychodrama:

Experiential Approaches for Group Therapists, Community Leaders, and Social Workers

Dr. Scott Giacomucci, DSW, LCSW, BCD, FAAETS, PAT

Link to the book:

Social Work, Sociometry, & Psychodrama: Experiential Approaches for Group Therapists, Community Leaders, and Social Workers Dr. Scott Giacomucci, DSW, LCSW, BCD, FAAETS, PAT

Reading List 2020

1590134395

In scribd

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Kindle

 

Place of Greater Safety, A: Volume 1

 

Audiobook Scribd

 

Hilary Mantel Collection: Six of Her Best Novels

 

Scribd — I’m  just interested in “A Place of Greater Safety.”  French Revolution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identity politics

Mistaken Identity by Asad Haider review – the best criticism of identity politics

I found this review of the book by Asad Haider satisfying — despite the title of the book, and the title of the review, I don’t think he just criticises identity politics. Haider defends a strand of it and criticises another and makes the distinction quite clear.

Haider traverses a tricky area. OTOH he can be critical of corporate feminism or indigenous capitalism. On the other hand he avoids two traps: One would be to go (or be seen to go) all sexist and racist. The other would be to fall into offensive class dogma, and say that all will be well in these areas of identity after the working class revolution.

Even in the summary in the review what is constructive and what is not, comes through clearly:

This is the original demand of identity politics, and it’s one that Haider embraces: for a revolutionary practice rooted in people’s identities as racialised, sexed, gendered and classed individuals who face interlocking systems of oppression. These systems have to be fought together, by organising people of different identities in what Haider calls “a project of universal emancipation” devoted to dismantling all of the structures that make them unfree, including and especially capitalism itself.

But if anticapitalist revolution is where identity politics began, it has since become something quite different, and is now invoked by certain liberals and leftists to serve distinctly non-revolutionary ends, Haider argues. It involves members of marginalised groups demanding inclusion, recognition, or restitution from above – a seat at the table. These demands are made in response to very real injuries endured by those groups. But their method, he says, ends up strengthening the structures that produced those injuries in the first place.

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I’m intrigued that Asad Haider is a PhD candidate in the History of Consciousness. I listened to him in a podcast and he is indeed knowledgeable in this area. See my blog post.

I look forward to what else he has written.

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Found this:

An Intercept interview with Haider.

Listen to the Marriage: A Novel – by John Jay Osborn

Amazon

I love this book!  ★  ★  ★  ★  ★

Probably because I’m possessed by all things couple therapy.  Though because of that i’d hate it if it was terrible therapy.  Most of the therapy in movies is bad.  Books are not much better. This one surprises!

I love the bit where a client is about to walk out, and the therapist says “Sit down!”.  Sounds terrible, but it’s perfectly timed, authentic, edgy for the therapist, and good for the client as it turns out.

I’m still puzzling how a law professor could write a book with such grasp on the art of therapy.

Get this book if you are interested in relationships!

Later: Sunday, 11 November 2018


Go to the podcast.

A wonderful interview with John Jay Osborn.

The link is to Pocket casts – a great app for iPhone – but I’m sure you can find other ways to listen to it.

A remarkable book and writer! And a good interviewer.