“Relational” TA and psychoanalysis, psychodrama and the relational paradigm 

I have been looking up anything to do with the relational paradigm  and keep bumping into relational psychoanalysis and relational T.A.

They seem fine. I’m surprised these branches of the tree are even needed – I would have thought that psychoanalysis and T.A. Were already “relational” in this way, i.e. Valuing of the relationship between the therapist and the client. Understanding attachment and early relationships as primary. Apparently not.

However I realise I’m in a different school altogether. One that see the relationship as the therapy, but not only the relationship with the therapist but the relationship people have with each other out there in the world. The marriage or committed loving relationship is the dominant one. I’ve come to understand that, especially in individual therapy, the relationship with the therapist can undermine the potential of the committed loving relationship with a partner. If there is no such relationship then the relationship with the therapist can be a surrogate, or if possible a way of facilitating the search for a mate. The rest of the time the therapist is there to facilitate the consciousness that will enable a committed loving relationship to be therapeutic. They are not naturally so – though they have a natural propensity to be so.

With this relational paradigm  more and more fully grasped of late I see that psychodrama has something of this philosophy well developed. Moreno speaks a lot of “in situ”. I think of that as working with the actual here and now relationships in a group.

Psychodrama does not require a theatrical setting, a frequent misunderstanding; it is done in situ – that is, wherever the subject is found.

Who Shall Survive? (1978) P86

However Moreno is not clear on this – Later in the same book he speaks again of therapy in situ

… it can take an immediate form, in situ, that is, in the course of all activities in which the individuals are en- gaged, in the home, in school, at work, for instance the handicraft shop, steam laundry, carpentry shop, department store, etc . The situations of living and working are at the same time used as therapeutic settings. We have found, however, that the analytic and activistic forms of group psychotherapy are not applicable to the deepest disturbances of the individual and the group; they require the application of deep action methods in the form of psychodrama. But they are applicable to social problems of the group in a setting in which, during the treatment, the group is artificially cut off from the community as if the rest of the community were non-existent and as if the influence coming from it could be disregarded.

He comes close to a relational paradigm, and then moves away for “the deepest disturbances of the individual and the group” to theatre where psychodrama clearly becomes treatment of or via a protagonist. Yet he stays close, because as we know, … the protagonist is a protagonist for the group. (ref?)

The idea that the relationship itself can be the source and vehicle for growth and healing, is not explicit in psychodrama – it is there in most psychotherapy, but only in the relationship between the client and the therapist. Yet this idea that the protagonist is working for the group can be translated to the protagonist working for the relationship. That helps!

The relational paradigm  is still to have its major impact, like any paradigm shift it is hard to get from the perspective of the old space.

Imago dialogue is one technique for activating relational healing, one that is easy to teach to clients. However I think T.A. Has the potential for that, Marshall Rosenberg NVC, and psychodrama does as well… Concretisation, role reversal, mirroring and doubling are potent methods. Psychodrama is not so easy without a director. How make the method easily accessible is what I’m working on all the time.

Shared Realities: Participation Mystique and Beyond — Mark Winborn

Shared Realities: Participation Mystique and Beyond

Screenshot

Heard about this on Shrink Rap Radio where Dr Dave interviews the author/editor Mark Winborn. Worth listening to.

I had to get the book, it is a sort of meditation on the nature of the relational space. It focusses on therapy, but this would be so relevant for those of us who consider that the marriage is the therapy.

Podcasts I’ve enjoyed lately

I’ve been using Pocketcasts on the iPhone. First one I’ve liked in all these years. The iTunes one never satisfied and the way I used to do it – was clumsy. But it worked and was essentially what did on the Palm.

Casts (as it also gets called) has a sharing function so I can easily pop them inhere from time to time. — though not the full audio. So the links might no work. When there is one I really want I’ll post the whole thing. The pocket cast links work only on the iPhone (or Android?) if you have the app.

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Are Computers Creative?

Studio 360 from PRI and WNYCEpisode:

http://www.pocketcasts.com/share/ttW4ML

I did follow this one up:

I liked this show. Why dpi these AI programs never use the Internet, Wolfram Alpgha etc? Siri creates its own search … I think the big breakthrough will come when they link all of these things – the music – art and writing and all search through some higher entity.

I just noticed the words “higher entity” I just mean a meta engine. Ha.

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RNZ: Saturday MorningEpisode: Kim Hill

Chris Szekely – Rahui and libraries

http://www.pocketcasts.com/share/s6Ur45

I like this and I have the book!

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/CU1110/S00196/rahui-an-exceptional-new-childrens-book.htm

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WeAreMany.org

Ways of Seeing: The Art Criticism of John Berger

http://www.pocketcasts.com/share/ODAn7Y

All the talks at the Chicago socialist conference are here. I like some of them.

Listened to this just as I was given this book

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RNZ: Saturday MorningEpisode: Kim Hill Saturday Morning 19 May 2012

Art with Mary Kisler – Angelica Garnett

http://www.pocketcasts.com/share/7TLKXO

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I like stuff about the Bloomsbury group. Bohemians.

Untitled

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I now have the Kindle Sample”

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Mac Power UsersEpisode:

Mac Power Users 56: Mail

http://www.pocketcasts.com/share/1s4pG1

Very long and a bit boring but what a resource if you want to understand Mail on the Mac.

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Harville Hendrix Audio

Click to play & download Harville Hendrix Helen Hunt Freud to Buddha

Note from: http://gettingtheloveyouwant.com/thinktank

The Challenge of Creating Change: Freud and the Budda in Dialogue with Imago
Join Harville Hendrix for a preview of the keynote presentation at the 8th Annual Conference

I listened to it and found it quite wonderful.

Harville places connectedness as a form of consciousness akin to or surpassing enlightenment. That is quite something. It makes sense to me as there is a resonance through the cosomos, things connect.


Spotted another Harville Hendrix one there on Behaviour Change:

Click to play & download Harville Hendrix on BCR

How I listen to podcasts.

 

  1. Find the RSS feed eg http://www.democracynow.org/democracynow.rss
  2. Subscribe in Google Reader. http://www.google.com/reader/view/#overview-page
  3. Have a filter in Google Reader to get all the podcasts subscriptions into a Podcast folder, easy to review!
  4. Slide *episodes* over into the Firefox Download Box (I have it configured to be in the sidebar) if I think I’ll like them, or will have time to listen.
  5. From the Download Folder slide all those mp3s into iTunes as music. Give them the My Podcast Genre (or similar). Make a smart playlist, and have that ticked to go to the iPhone upon a sync.
  6. Walk! Listen. Rate. Once they are rated they leave the Podcast playlist (that how I set up the smart playlist). I use one star meaning delete. Soft reboot to clear the list.

That’s my Podcast System. Cumbersome? Tell me a better way.

I get exactly what I want. They stay in the Playlist till I’m done & then they go.

I can’t get that control with the built in Podcast folder, or the iTunes subscription system.

I see I made a post about this system before, has some more details.

Here is my podcast list in Google Reader

Manufacturing Depression

Democracy Now! 1 March 2010

There are several stories in this hour long program, one about earthquakes, one about race in a Californian university, and one about depression. The last one tells me what I know as a psychotherapy to be true. Not that antidepressants don’t always work, but that why they work is a big muddle, it could be the placebo effect or just time. And the price for this dubious result is to pathologise millions of people, to get them thinking about the psyche in a medical & unhelpful way.

All for huge profit.

The DSM 5 is a scandal and will make the problem worse!

All part of a 150 year trend… that bit was new to me.

Video of the Depression story on Democracy Now

Every health professional should watch this video, listen to this last story in this episode of Democracy Now, or read the book by Gary Greenberg, Amazon:

Manufacturing Depression: The Secret History of a Modern Disease

Manufacturing Depression?:

The primary point that Greenberg expressed in the interview is that we are taking a normal human experience and turning it into a disease. He makes it clear that he has no problem with relieving the suffering of depression with drugs, but he questions whether we have turned normal blue moods into a disease in order to justify medicating away sadness.

A satisfying read online is where Greenberg is interviewed on the Well. Quote follows.

Continue reading

Dynamic Facilitation

I am still intrigued by Dynamic Facilitation. I was recently asked a question about it: What about facilitator bias? Made me think and I discussed this question in various places. Clearly there is a lot of skill needed in the facilitation, however it is a clearly prescribed process.

Several things guard against excessive dependence on the facilitator, and prevent bias.

  • The focus on the creative output. I imagine this is facilitated by the charts.
  • The equal weight given to divergent perspectives.

Then as I was pondering this a podcast arrived – probably had been on the ipod for a while:

Click to play, right click to download Psychologist interviews Jim Rough.  Shrink Rap Radio

 

It is an excellent interview, it is not full of technical details, the simplicity of the method continues to impress.

And on facilitator bias, Jim at one point shows how he does not say “I hear you … ” too much “I”, we want to leave that out. ”

Jim’s presentation makes what he does seem so ordinary and invisible that it is worth looking at Rosa Zubizarreta’s Manual for Jim Rough’s Dynamic Facilitation Method.

On the evolution of science.

I have just listened to a spectacular podcast. From 2006 – I missed it till I changed my system of managing podcasts – giving in to the iTunes default way.

Kevin Kelly – The Next 100 Years of Science: Long-term Trends in the Scientific Method.

Download: iTunesDirect download

The textual summary is here:

http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/kelly06/kelly06_index.html

I continue to discuss the podcast and relate themes to my own writing.

Continue reading

Interview with Charles Eisenstein

Play has been on my mind. And I just listened to this which sounds ok to me about halfway through there is a good bit on play.

From http://www.futureprimitive.org/

Joanna Harcourt Smith interviews
[Charles Eisenstein] June 27, 2009 – Interview with Charles Eisenstein
(50 minutes – 17.3mb)
Charles Eisenstein is the author of The Ascent of Humanity: The Age of Separation, the Age of Reunion, and the convergence of crises that is birthing the transition – a book about the history and future of civilization from a unique perspective: the evolution of the human sense of self.

Joanna Harcourt Smith interviews
[Charles Eisenstein] June 27, 2009 – Interview with Charles Eisenstein
(50 minutes – 17.3mb)